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4 edition of The needs of the working poor found in the catalog.

The needs of the working poor

United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions.

The needs of the working poor

helping families to make ends meet : hearing of the Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions, United States Senate, One Hundred Seventh Congress, second session on examining the needs of the working poor and helping welfare recipients find work and balance the needs of their families, February 14, 2002

by United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions.

  • 253 Want to read
  • 24 Currently reading

Published by U.S. G.P.O., For sale by the Supt. of Docs., U.S. G.P.O., [Congressional Sales Office] in Washington .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Poor -- Services for -- United States,
  • Welfare recipients -- Employment -- United States,
  • Work and family -- United States

  • Edition Notes

    SeriesS. hrg -- 107-295
    The Physical Object
    Paginationiii, 117 p.
    Number of Pages117
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL15515517M
    ISBN 100160685451
    OCLC/WorldCa50288848


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The needs of the working poor by United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions. Download PDF EPUB FB2

The needs of the working poor: helping families to make ends meet: hearing of the Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions, United States Senate, One Hundred Seventh Congress, second session on examining the needs of the working poor and helping welfare recipients find work and balance the needs of their families, Febru   It is a great privilege to be here today to discuss the needs of the working poor and how we can help families to make ends meet.

With the passage of welfare reform inwe entered into a de facto contract with poor Americans without jobs. And unlike most works on poverty, this book also offers compelling portraits of employers struggling against razor-thin profits and competition from abroad.

With pointed recommendations for change that challenge Republicans and Democrats alike, The Working Poor stands to make a by: The Working Poor Themes The Precarious Lives of the Poor Shipler repeatedly makes the case that poverty is a “constellation of difficulties that magnify one another” (), meaning that factors such as low wages, low educational and skill levels, and poor health are closely interlinked.

And unlike most works on poverty, this book also offers compelling portraits of employers struggling against razor-thin profits and competition from abroad.

With pointed recommendations for change that challenge Republicans and Democrats alike, The Working Poor stands to make a difference.4/5(14).

UAA/APU Books of the Year The Working Poor: Invisible in America by David K. Shipler Chapter 2: Work Doesn’t Work Summary by the Foundation for Community Empowerment.

Questions by UAA/APU Books of the Year staff. SUMMARY Chapter 2, “Work Doesn’t Work,” The needs of the working poor book the struggles of three working women as they attempt to climb out of poverty.

He wrote the national bestseller The Working Poor: Invisible in America. The book’s aim is to discover, analyze, and expose the lives of the people who do work that is essential to America’s comfort and prosperity but who do not share in it. § Expressed the need for “cushion money” § Department Stores Cheat and deceive.

o Free Enterprise Economy § Inflation from increasing wages § Need of education to excel Minorities with education are forced to work poor jobs. o Nara’s Story Chapter 4- Harvest of Shame.

This book is organized into eleven chapters, each focusing on a theme and/or the contributing factors related to a major cause or effect of poverty.

Chapter 1 & 2 begin with the problems associated. According to Census data, more than 7 percent of American workers fell below the federal poverty line, making less than $11, for a single person and $15, for a some estimates, one in four private-sector jobs in the U.S.

pays under $10 an hour. Last month, Senate Republicans blocked a bill that would have raised the federal minimum wage from $ to $ an hour, despite. From the author of the Pulitzer Prize–winning Arab and Jew, an intimate portrait unfolds of working American families struggling against insurmountable odds to escape poverty.

As David K. Shipler 4/5(15). UAA/APU Books of the Year The Working Poor: Invisible in America by David Shipler Chapter 5: The Daunting Workplace Shipler did find some success stories, which often included a worker in need of a job and a compassionate and energetic employer, yet a basic economic and social problem exists that cannot be solved by the private sector.

Books like Barbara Ehrenreich's Nickel and Dimed and David Shipler's The Working Poor tell us that the poor are doing exactly what America expects of them—finding jobs, rising early to get to work every day, chasing the American dream—but that our system of "carnivorous capitalism" is so heavily arrayed against them that they can't rise out of poverty or live a decent life.

From the author of the Pulitzer Prize–winning Arab and Jew, an intimate portrait unfolds of working American families struggling against insurmountable odds to escape poverty.

As David K. Shipler makes clear in this powerful, humane study, the invisible poor are engaged in the activity most respected in American ideology—hard, honest work.

this is a very good book to read if you know a little about the policy problems facing the working poor and want to get a better idea of the human stories of people affected by them, or if you don't know anything about the daily lives of the working poor and need a good illustration of the thicket of problems trapping them in poverty.4/5().

The Working Poor: Invisible in America is a book written by Pulitzer Prize-winner David K. Shipler. From personal interviews and research, Shipler presents in this book anecdotes and life stories of individuals considered the working poor.

Books similar to The Working Poor: Invisible in America The Working Poor: Invisible in America. by David K. Shipler. avg. rating Ratings. As David K.

Shipler makes clear in this powerful, humane study, the invisible poor are engaged in the activity most respected in American ideology—hard, honest work. But their version of the. Shipler delves deeply into the obstacles facing the working poor.

They face the intertwined problems of dead-end and low-paying jobs, decaying housing, lack of health care, poor education, few job training programs, insensitive and cruel employers, hunger, malnutrition, junk food diets, miniscule bank accounts, and widespread depression and.

The stories of the working poor defy that promise. The intersection of employment and poverty is where the fairy tale fails. Meet Peaches, who began working in a factory at age eight, was raped while enrolled in the Job Corps, and was abused by a parade of boyfriends.

Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist David Shipler observed some impoverished working Americans and their families for years to research his new book, "The Working Poor." Ray Suarez.

From the author of the Pulitzer Prize–winning Arab and Jew, an intimate portrait unfolds of working American families struggling against insurmountable odds to escape poverty. As David K. Shipler makes clear in this powerful, humane study, the invisible poor are engaged in the activity most respected in American ideology—hard, honest work/5(13).

"The system needs to be straightened out," says one worker who, inwas making $ an hour—80 cents more than when she started factory work in "They need. "The Working Poor" by David Shipler is not an easy read.

Densely written, it covers the lives of many poor people living in the U.S., struggling to subsist. The book's title is apt, because in many cases people in poverty truly do work.

Poverty is an urgent issue in the American society especially among the working poor. These issue need to be addressed by the government in collaboration with other agents for improvement of the living standards of the working poor.

There is clearly a pressing need to deal more vigorously with this drug problem and the epidemic of fatal overdoses and liver disease that has affected the poor and working class in particular.

David Shipler authored the book The Working Poor in The book has won Pulitzer Prize. The author had talked to individuals perceived to be the working poor.

Consequently, he has filled the book with their life stories and anecdotes. He illustrates the hardships experienced by the working poor as they attempt to run away from poverty. The working poor will receive extended support, but those suffering from disabilities, mental illness, or substance abuse issues will find themselves without TANF cash assistance if they require treatment that extends beyond a week, or must be treated more than six weeks in a one year period.

The “working poor” are people who spend 27 weeks or more in a year in the labor force either working or looking for work but whose incomes fall below the poverty ing to the U.S.

Bureau of Labor Statistics, about million of people who spent at least 27 weeks in the labor force were poor. Then check out our map and report for more info on An agenda to give America’s working poor a raise.

Myth #1: Most workers in low-wage jobs are young or starting out at the entry level. If you define a “low” wage as under $15 per hour, you’re referring to almost half the workforce in.

Preface: Making Space for the Working Poor Acknowledgments A Note on the Text Part 1 - Unsettled Subjects 1. Mobilizing the Poor 2. London’s Economy of Unsettledness—and Beyond 3. Disguising the Working Poor: Harman’s Caveat 4. Unsettled Subjectivity: The Virtual "I" Part 2 - The Case of Edward Barlow 5.

"Not Well Settled in My Mind" 6. working poor was $, only slightly higher than where it started at the beginning of the decade. table 1. Characteristics of the Working Poor in and year near-full-employment economy year Weak-recovery economy Number of poor prime-working-age adults million million % in poverty % % % in labor force %.

Summary Of ' The Working Poor ' Words | 10 Pages. Michael James Ms. Phelps Pols The Working Poor Essay The Working Poor is a story of hard times in our lives, that can vary in times of the poor struggles, middle class struggles, and just overall all struggles of everyday people whom have difficult times in their lives.

Books World Mission Working with the Poor: Selected Passages from Ellen G. White on Social Responsibility people to minister to the needs of others and to eff ect social change in the statistics could be quoted on the elderly, the homeless, the working poor, as well as the rural poor.

The poverty rate—the ratio of the working poor to all persons in the labor force for at least 27 weeks—was percent, little changed from (See table A.) A majority of the working poor ( percent) usually worked full time (35 hours or more a week), although full-time work substantially lowers a person’s probability of being poor.

No Shame in My Game: The Working Poor in the Inner City - Ebook written by Katherine S. Newman. Read this book using Google Play Books app on your PC, android, iOS devices.

Download for offline reading, highlight, bookmark or take notes while you read No Shame in My Game: The Working Poor. Some working poor people are able to use their social networks—if they have them—to meet their transportation needs. In a study on low-income single mothers, Edin and Lein found that single mothers who had someone to drive them to and from work were much more likely to be able to support themselves without relying on government aid.

Introduction. From the author of the Pulitzer Prize–winning Arab and Jew, an intimate portrait unfolds of working American families struggling against insurmountable odds to escape poverty.

As David K. Shipler makes clear in this powerful, humane study, the invisible poor are engaged in the activity most respected in American ideology—hard, honest work. The ranks of the working poor are growing because wages at the bottom have dropped, adjusted for inflation.

With increasing numbers of Americans taking. DAVID K. SHIPLER reported for The New York Times from to in New York, Saigon, Moscow, Jerusalem, and Washington, is the author of six previous books, including the best sellers Russia and The Working Poor, as well as Arab and Jew, which won the Pulitzer has been a guest scholar at the Brookings Institution and a senior associate at the Carnegie Endowment for.

Definition of working poor in the dictionary. Meaning of working poor. What does working poor mean. Information and translations of working poor in the most comprehensive dictionary definitions resource on the web. Even though SNAP provides an important support for the working poor, this population is often particularly hard to reach.

In75 percent of the eligible working poor participated. In 40 states and the District of Columbia, individuals in working-poor households participated at a lower rate than all eligible individuals nationally.

This article examines the phenomenon of working poverty and issues relating to employment and the working poor. It first provides an overview of the problems of definition and measurement regarding the working poor, along with the consequences of the diversity of definitions.

In particular, it considers different current definitions of the statistical category “working poor” and how. Poor people know they should save 20% of each paycheck, but that’s kinda hard when they’re already living on the bare essentials and still coming up short every month.

Poor people know they should invest, but the baby needs formula more than Mom needs a stock portfolio.